Orthotics

Orthotics are custom made shoe inserts made from a casted mold of your feet to correct faulty biomechanics. Foot orthotics come in a variety of different materials to control excessive motion of the foot and provide cushioning to areas that demonstrate excessive pressures during the gait cycle. They are made for both walking and running, following a biomechanical examination and video gait analysis.

Gabe Punke
John Krusenklaus
Medical Director, PT, OCS Learn More About John

What is the Function of Orthotics?

If your foot has excessive or limited range of motion when striking the ground (overpronatation or underpronation), joint pain and soft tissue injuries, usually involving tendons, are likely to occur, especially with increasing activity levels. The foot has 28 bones, all moving simultaneously in less than one half of a second when the foot is on the ground and orthotics facilitate proper sequencing of foot mechanics to help the body transfer and absorb forces more efficiently.

You may need orthotics if you have:

  • Joint or soft tissue pain most commonly found in the foot, ankle, and/or knee. Hip imbalances and low back pain with standing or walking activities can also be alleviated with foot orthotic intervention.
  • Re-occurring injuries on one side of the body indicating malalignment of the lower leg
  • Leg length differences-very common-large contributor to low back pain and scoliosis
  • Lower leg malalignment/excessive knock-kneed (valgus) or bow legged (varus)
  • Excessive toeing in or toeing out
  • Excessive callous formation on bottom of the foot indicating abnormal plantar pressures-there should not be any callouses on the foot.
  • Chronic tendonitis or tendinosis (degenerative changes in the tendon) in the foot or ankle
  • Chronic ankle instability (recurrent ankle sprains)
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